Emotional Help

Quick Points for Emotional healing.

Take time away from the computer, tv and twitter/text.  Make quality time with your family.  Below are some tips we found that may help you.  Monitor your own well being and stay healthy.

Making contact with others can help reduce feelings of distress

Children and adolescents can benefit from spending some time with other similar-age peers

Connections can be with family, friends, or others who are coping with the same traumatic event

Source:  Handouts for survivors, see below.

 

Online tools and references

 

Psychological First Aid: Field Operations Guide

Providers and Researchers

For Disaster Responders

PFA is an evidence-informed modular approach for assisting people in the immediate aftermath of disaster and terrorism: to reduce initial distress, and to foster short and long-term adaptive functioning. It is for use by disaster responders including first responders, incident command systems, primary and emergency health care providers, school crisis response teams, faith-based organizations, disaster relief organizations, Community Emergency Response Teams, Medical Reserve Corps, and the Citizens Corps in diverse settings. NOTE: Available in Chinese. See below.

Handouts for Survivors (PDF 2.1mb)

National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome issued this documentation for the public’s use in dealing with the trauma associated following disasters

Topics included in this Appendix:

Connecting with Others: Seeking Social Support (For adults and adolescents)

Connecting with Others: Giving Social Support (For adults and adolescents)

When Terrible Things Happen (For adults and adolescents)

Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers (For parents/caregivers)

Parent Tips for Helping Preschool-Age Children (For parents/caregivers)

Parent Tips for Helping School-Age Children (For parents/caregivers)

Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents (For parents/caregivers)

Tips for Adults (For adult survivors)

Basic Relaxation Techniques (For adults, adolescents and children)

Alcohol and Drug Use after Disasters (For adults and adolescents

National Child Traumatic Stress Network Knowledge Bank NCTSN

 Established by Congress in 2000, the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) is a unique collaboration of academic and community-based service centers whose mission is to raise the standard of care and increase access to services for traumatized children and their families across the United States The National Child Traumatic Stress Network Knowledge Bank provides access and referral to the resources, programs, projects and people that are part of the Network. Most resources cataloged here are just a click away! The Knowledge Bank also features resources from organizations outside the Network.

Materials in Creole from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network

Online disaster support can be emotionally draining.

Take time away from the computer, tv and twitter/text.  Make quality time with your family.  Below are some tips we found that may help you.  Monitor your own well being and stay healthy.

When to seek professional help for emotional or psychological trauma

Recovering from a traumatic event takes time, and everyone heals at his or her own pace. But if months have passed and your symptoms aren’t letting up, you may need professional help from a trauma expert.

It’s a good idea to seek professional help if you’re:

  • Having trouble functioning at home or work
  • Suffering from severe fear, anxiety, or depression
  • Unable to form close, satisfying relationships
  • Experiencing terrifying memories, nightmares, or flashbacks
  • Avoiding more and more things that remind you of the trauma
  • Emotionally numb and disconnected from others
  • Using alcohol or drugs to feel better

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

PTSD is the most severe form of emotional and psychological trauma. Its primary symptoms include intrusive memories or flashbacks, avoiding things that remind you of the traumatic event, and living in a constant state of “red alert”. If you have PTSD, it’s important to see a trauma specialist.

To learn more, see Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Trauma self-help strategies:

  • Don’t isolate. Following a trauma, you may want to withdraw from others. But isolation makes things worse. Connecting to others will help you heal, so make an effort to maintain your relationships and avoid spending too much time alone.
  • Ask for support. It’s important to talk about your feelings and ask for the help you need. Turn to a trusted family member, friend, counselor, or clergyman. You may also want to join a support group for trauma survivors. Support groups are especially helpful if your personal support network is limited.
  • Establish a daily routine. In order to stay grounded after a trauma, it helps to have a structured schedule to follow. Try to stick to a daily routine, with regular times for waking, sleeping, eating, working, and exercise. Make sure to schedule time for relaxing and social activities, too.
  • Take care of your health. A healthy body increases your ability to cope with stress. Get plenty of rest, exercise regularly, and eat a well-balanced diet. It’s also important to avoid alcohol and drugs. Alcohol and drug use can worsen your trauma symptoms and exacerbate feelings of depression, anxiety, and isolation.

Source:  http://www.helpguide.org/mental/emotional_psychological_trauma.htm

Page Editor:  @Peaceful_intent

  1. February 10, 2010 at 4:25 pm

    Hi, I have a friend who is a US Airforce vet. He works with PTSD a lot. He told me about EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing). It was developed after Nam. He says it has saved a lot of lives. It works mainly with the symptons, but for someone who is in the throes, that can be a blessing.

    Other forms of intervention are:

    Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy.
    Family therapy.
    Medication.

  2. February 12, 2013 at 11:09 am

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